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20131105
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and strengthen america's defense capabilities. i thank the gentleman who will introduce and moderate our speakers. brad is the editor of armed forces journal. it has been published since 1863. congratulations to them. he has written extensively about the u.s. navy. bradley if you will? >> well, we live in interesting times. we have left iraq. we are drawing down in afghanistan. we are still pursuing al qaeda and similar groups. syria is burning. china is rising. it has not settled whether it is rival or partner. climate change is altering the world. globalization has entwined as productively and made us more brittle. our communications web allows the spread of violent ideas and unimaginable speed. the general who runs the development center put it this way. the momentum of human interaction is increasing exponentially. the security environment is changing. our military services which have spent much of the past decade relearning the lessons of counterinsurgency and expanding upon them are trying to figure out what they should be 5, 10, 20 years from now. the strategy side is just half of it. afte
ground defenses, you have to realize almost all those people not being convicted our blacks. 69% of blacks who raise the stand your ground defense were not convicted. that compares to 62% for whites. 80% of hispanics who raise the defense are not convicted. if blacks are being discriminated against because their killers are not facing any penalty, would it not also follow that blacks are being discriminated in favor of blacks who claim soft defense understand your ground law are convicted at much lower rates than other racial groups? is not all also these cases are the same. blacks are killed in confrontations where -- were 13 percentage points more likely to be armed than whites. blacks,lled by other the were more often in process of committing other crimes. they were involved in cases where was likely to have a witness. if you run regressions where you try to call all the factors that were brought up in the data set, you find that white defendants are more likely to be convicted by black defendants, and people invoking stand your ground laws who kill blacks are also more like
. stand your ground laws, like all self-defense laws, require the heightened showing of necessity. the particular version of florida's 2005 law differs drastically from other laws and from the common law of self-defense in three respects. first, these laws remove the common law duty to retreat. this emboldens individuals to escalate a situation. the duty to retreat implies a duty to safely retreat. second, they shift the reasonable presumption of ear. under the florida law, he may be presumed to be fearful. this removes the responsibility to affirmatively show the necessity to take a human ife. thirdly, it has the unintended effect of encouraging vigilante is some that normal law revents. i discuss all of these issues at length in my written testimony. i also analyze the empirical evidence. to say that these laws decrease the incidence of crime, i think here are correlations there, ut i have not found causal evidence. stand your ground has little impact on homicide reduction. they appear to correlate with an increase in certain types of violent crime. time does not permit me more
your ground defense laws calling for states to qualify their standards which vary and are applied inconsistently. this is live coverage on c-span. >> young trayvon martin sought to defend himself because i strongly suspect that mr. zimmerman could not apprehend any lawful reason for a young black male to walk through his middle-class neighborhood. to mr. zimmerman, the blackness served as a crude roxy for criminality. this unfortunate outcome sends a twofold message. first, it tells floridians they can incorrectly profile lung -- young brack -- young black children, kill them, and be protected by standard ground laws. it sends a more ominous message to young black children for it consider myself fortunate to live in a jurisdiction that does not have stand your ground laws. what if it did? i have an african-american son who is just shy of his 13th birth date whose name ironically is trey. what advice would you give him? ie only responsible advice if lived in a standard grandeur is diction would be that if he ever felt seriously threatened by a stranger, that he would have to use a
to address is corporate tax reform, in which case we could eliminate it. on defense spending, no question in my mind that additional reductions in defense spending are going to have to happen, are going to have to go forward and done in a way that focuses on strategic goals of protecting this country going forward. and yes, again, we are back to the same situation, balancing out those spending reductions, in defense, food stamps, child nutrition programs. we have to find a balance in order to stay on a path that is fiscally sound for our children and grandchildren. host: this is an editorial from "usa today," don't cut the big benefit programs. we must not balance the budget on the most vulnerable people in the country. what is his role in the conference effort? guest: he is going to make the case for the protection of the vulnerable members of our society and the benefits and the safety net society and that's a useful role that he plays. however, i would also say as i said at the outset that the basic problem here is that it's the entitlement programs, not is afety net programs, it the
services committee, has been very much involved putting those sanctions in place. alas national defense authorization act had the last tranche in that bill. i'm not one who has any sense at all and opposed to sanctions. as opposed, i am very for it. if we respond to this possibility in a negative way instead of being study and keeping sanctions in place, if we tighten the screws now when it looks as though, apparently against some opposition at home and in iran, that the iranian leadership may be willing to talk about ending, modifying, changing and making less threatening their nuclear program, and to response is negative, they could very well lose the very countries, particularly russia and china, who have stood with us to put sanctions in place internationally. it would weaken our current stations possibly, and i would say probably but at least possibly, for us to respond possibly, for us to respond rhetorically or through additional sanctions in a negative way before we have taken the couple of months that are needed to explore the reality as to whether there is a real change in ira
there and the defense minister in brussels before we afghanistan. feel that things have significantly improved and changed for the better during the last ten-year period. have been there perhaps 12 times or so. my staff who is with me today will tell me later on it was only 11 or it was really 13. have been there a lot. and the changes are pretty striking, particularly in the last few years. that is not the impression which the american people have and i will get into that in a moment. but that to me is the obvious fact that things have changed better.nged for the number of ways in afghanistan. first of all, it is more secure. is more secure because we came. it is that simple. we and our allies have made a difference. army,rowth of the afghan the strength of the afghan army on the police now, which has grown into a much more capable and respected force, including local police, which has made a major difference villages ofy in the afghanistan because they are directly connected to the elders in those villages. feared forcemost policeose 25,000 local feared by the taliban and because they are so
. there is a better way, colleagues. is there-- my view parity between defense and nondefense. the rule of the whole -- theration debate rules were that you are going to cut defense and nondefense equally. to change those rules in the middle of this debate would be a very substantial mistake. what we do with respect to defense, we need to make an health,mmitment to education, infrastructure, and finance investment that will secure our future. those three areas, taxes, medicare reforms, and budget fairness strike me as three areas where we can come together and find common ground. i look forward to working with all of you. >> thank you. cliburn.yburn -- mr. the task of this committee is to an agreement budget. while it would've been prudent to have these negotiations last summer, i am pleased that we are now beginning these important discussions. address the automatic spending cuts that are hurting our economy and undercutting important priorities like education, medical research, and national security. ation'smust put our n fiscal house in order and reduce our debt to a manageable level. there are d
defense and other key priorities. we feel it, i know you feel it. i want to focus on four areas where i think we are closer together than we might think as an encouragement to finding compromise. first, we should acknowledge the 2014 budget numbers are not that different. the senate sets discretionary trillion.t $1.058 senate number is 1.508. the difference is about 2.5%. i think you would argue it is smaller, because the republicans would argue the senate numbers might be artificially high because we assume there would be no continuation of sequester. we assume the house number is artificially low. so i think the real difference is about 1.5%. i can't believe we're going to miss an opportunity to do something right for the nation, for our economy, because we can't close a difference in 2014 of 1.5%. we are closer than we might think in 2014. number two, we should all agree that growing the economy should be the primary goal. the major test of a successful budget is not inc. on a page, or even the gdp to debt ratio. it is whether a government spending plan helps produce a growing econom
and replace sequestration in different wales. the house budget fully replaces the defense cut, lists the b.c.a. cap, and pays for that by cutting from key domestic vements -- investments. the senate budget pays for that with an equal mix of spending cuts and revenue caused by wasteful tax loopholes that benefit the wealthiest americans and corporations. so getting a bipartisan deal to replace quest racial is going to require compromise. there is no way around it. i am going into this budget conference ready to agree to some tough spending cuts that unlike the quester -- sequester caps that disappear in 2022, will be locked into law. i know there are some republicans that would be interested in swapping some of the infish and damaging sequester cuts with programs that would save many multiples of cuts over the decades. i'm ready to listen to their ideas. as long as they are fair for seen yoirs and their families, i'm ready to make some concessions to get a deal. commowmies runs both ways. while we scour programs to find responsible savings, republicans are also going to work with us to scou
. the russians i think raise a valid issue, whiches is the relationship between offense and defense, and that means addressing some issues between ssia and moscow on missile defense. sergey and i have had this discussion on arms before. certainly there is a relationship between strategic offense and strategic defense. i would agree that at some point there should be a treaty regulating missile defense. the fral practical reality is that's not possible here now. that's an american problem. that's an american problem with the u.s. senate. i guess @ at this point i would say, if we can't fix that, can we doing in something else snl and from the perspective for the foreseeable future the gap from strategic offense and defense is going to be so large, maybe there's another way to go. what i'm hoping is if we get more experience working together on syria and iran, there may be prospects for washington and oss cow to -- moscow to return to an agenda where they have consistent improvement from the past. taking missile defense, if you could resolve those problems, move back toward the idea t
surveillance programs. witnesses will include james clapper, james cole, and keith alexander. >> defense secretary chuck hagel held a news conference with the defense minister of new zealand. he was asked about nsa spying and iran's nuclear program. this is 15 minutes. >> afternoon. aftert afternoon -- good noon. jonathan coleman and i just finished a working lunch where we reinforced of the close ties between the united states and new zealand. having fought together in every major conflict of the last century, including afghanistan, our bonds are rooted in common interests but also in the history and values we share. our partnership is important. it is important to peace and prosperity in the asia-pacific and the united states remains committed to strengthening this partnership as one opponent of our rebalance to the region. we emphasized the significant progress we have made in expanding our defense cooperation since the washington declaration was signed last year. in addition to high-level visits like this one, we have had a productive set of exercises and training initiatives. the fi
if the initial period of clearance has lapsed. for example, this summer for 10 weeks the department of defense has been in periodic reviews of some contractor employees due to funding shortfalls. i'd like to hear from our witnesses today about how often suspensions like that are happening across the federal government. i'd also like to hear about what agencies are doing to manage risks to our security clearances -- when clearances are not re-examined on schedule through the periodic review process. today we have been joined by officials from four agencies responsible for the policies and procedures used to determine who is eligible to obtain security clearance and access to government facilities and computers. they are the office of management and budget. the office of personnel management. the office of the director of national intelligence. and the department of defense. we want these officials to talk with us this morning about the critical security related policies and procedures and also the coordinated reviews of these processes now under way throughout the government in the aftermath of
we learn about the threat is something that is necessary and important to the defense of this country. we see the threats that come in to this nation. see what a foreign intelligence agency is expected to see. prior to 9-11, we had no way of collecting those dots. nsa would see one side and the fbi the other. how can we connect these dots and do it in the least intrusive manner. , the senate, the executive branch, and the courts, we have programs to do that. you for yourthank comments. the statements you have made are greatly appreciated. and in then at nsa military still remembers that day and our commitment to those people that we will not forget. that does not mean we are going to trample on our civil liberties and privacy. how do we do both? wet is the constitution that all swore to uphold and defend. that's what we are doing. look at the program we have. citizens, everyone at this table is also an american citizen, have agreed we would take our personal data and put it into a lockbox. it would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulable suspicion that we had connecti
a a newd campus an international campus women's economic . defense dollars to open up a women's economic development school, a.i.d.?'t that why is it d.o.d.? significantly to the security of the country, but i think basically the answer is because the d.o.d. did a number of things including some of the commanders' expenditures which helped the development of that is so essential to its security and this is part of it. at thee story we got american university at a town meeting we had there is one hisdent we talked about life experience. when the taliban was there, he took refuge with his family. a younger boy at that time. for safety.o iran taliban wereheas th driven out, he came back and was accepted at the american university. taught himself as a matter of fact, how to read and how to right. he is now interviewing for a job as a sales manager at seimens and applying for a scholarship. there are four fullbright scholars at the american university in kabul. wanted me to say thanks to the american people. so this is as close as i will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not
to a national laboratory that is a critical player in the nation's defense, andal employ some of the brightest minds. i'm going to region excerpt from a letter -- i am going to read excerpt from a letter. these interactions are critical to keeping our researchers at the cutting edge in their field. he shares my desire to ensure that we are spending our taxpayer dollars wisely. offers suggestions for developing standards for evaluating and managing the cost and risk of conference spending. i have another letter that is from the center from association leadership. clearly, we do not want these mistakes made. we want to be careful that we do not minimize opportunities that make us a more efficient and effective government. i would ask to put this record of a letter. -- i would asked to put this letter in the record. >> so ordered. >> i hope that we leave this hearing with the kinds of issues that we have identified should never come before this committee or anyone else again. wise, smart,ing efficient, effective leadership in all of our public entities. we want the recommendations put in place ef
the defense department. concerning background checks for people with security clearance. this is two hours and 20 minutes. >> good morning. here we will come to order. welcome, one and all. on monday, september 16, a horrible tragedy unfolded the navy yard in washington, d.c. a very troubled individual took 12 lights in a senseless act of violence. the circumstances led to these tragedies are multidimensional. the issues raised by this tragedy such as the adequacy of our gun laws and the quality of mental health care are outside the purview of this committee. but as we have learned more about aaron alexis, a member of my colleagues and i have been asking each other why such a troubled, unstable individual possessed the security clearance from the u.s. government. granted a originally security clearance when he did not disclose his arrest record on his application. why did the investigator responsible for looking into that right up or a lexus had "retaliated by deflating someone's tires instead of disclosing that alexis had shot those tires. such violence how could've taken place in the nav
, the defense bill, move them all individually. there is not enough time when we talk about the calendar. there is not enough time to move all of the bills individually at this point. host: sarah from dover, pennsylvania. caller: good morning. i would like to change the subject a little bit if i can. i live on medicare. the medicare and food stamps -- i am surviving on $125 a week. if they take food stamps away from me -- the -- [indiscernible] he needs to feeds us first before he feeds anyone else. and also, we have a place to live. our guys come home from the service. they are losing because they have no place to live. i would like to see that to happen, too. thank you. host: there is a story in politico. the headline talks about the farm bill that it gets no respect, referencing rodney dangerfield. why is this an important discussion happening? guest: the last time we had a farm bill, that law expired in 2008. what is it, 2013? it has been five years since we had a new farm bill passed. the fact they are going into conference to sit down in both chambers, that is huge. that is somethi
meeting withw days our commanders, our troops, president karzai. and the defense minister from brussels before he went to afghanistan. he feels that things have significantly improved and changed for the better during the last 10 years. i have been there perhaps 12 times or so. the staff later will tell me if it is really a 11 or 13. we've been there a lot. strikinges are pretty especially in the last few years. that is not the impression the american people have. that, to me, is the obvious fact that things have changed and changed for the better in afghanistan. first of all, it's more secure. we and our allies have made a the growth, the strength of the afghan army and the police now which has grown in a much more capable and respected force including the acal police, which has made major difference particularly in the villages about anna stan -- villages of afghanistan. the most feared force are those 25,000 local police feared by the taliban. because they are so directly ed to the homes and they become a major threat to the taliban control and success. they are a resilient force and
to the date before ricky alder's deadlty -- deadly attack, the department of defense testified to this committee, and this was in june of 2005, about the automated continuous evaluation system. and you all said you are going to continuously evaluate the background. mr. prioletti, in your written statement, you noted three years earlier in 2008 -- three years later, from the 2005 testimony you gave before his committee, -- this committee, president bush directed by his executive order that an individual who is -- shallfor classified be subject to continuous evaluation. that was an executive order back in 2008. i know we heard today, we're working on this. we heard we have an interagency working group. we're developing a concept of operations. i wrote this down. we're doing research. this has been going on now for a decade. a decade. if you testified in 2005, was going on in 2004, maybe more than a decade. so here we are. it's five years after the executive order, eight years after this committee heard about the plans, and we're dealing with the tragedy at the navy yard. i don't
, domestic and foreign. we work closely with the state department, usaid, defense department, with the government of iraq, and many others in order to prevent and resolve violent conflicts. i would like to recognize some of the folks here today. of course, prime minister maliki, thank you for returning to the institute. we have the minister of foreign affairs, the minister of defense, the national security advisor, and both members of the council of representatives. the ambassador to the united states, the chief staff to the prime minister, the chief media adviser in the office of the prime minister, head of counterterrorism bureau, deputy chief of mission for the embassy of iraq, and the military general who is the attach? for the embassy of iraq. also joining us today, former secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state for the united states, madeleine albright. i am listing her as part of the usip team, which includes steve hadley, george moose, jeremy rabkin, dr. kristin lord, our executive vice president. i would like to recognize a couple of special state
i know trying to work and keep the defense department focused and dealing with 3 million americans who serve courageously in that department, i know they count on your leadership and you are doing an outstanding job under very difficult circumstances. 100 100 years. i'm honored by the purpose of the anti-defamation league to , fight for equality and equal justice. this country was founded on the principles. the veryds us of purpose of our democracy and that makes all of you great american patriots. [applause] i think i first learned about l when i was in congress and i have the opportunity to be able to learn about it. i stayed with several members of us who stayede of in washington. we stayed together. i think it's fair to say it was animal house on capitol hill. [laughter] one of the members as pointed out in the photograph was chuck schumer, someone you all know and has a tremendous passion for israel. the bottom of the house in this living room area and we made a bed. i tried to get him to say a hail mary and he made me say the shema. we tried to cover all the bases and we did.
established with the department of defense. that offove to make the record, but i cannot. i am sure mike some of my colleagues would say what are we using the department of defense dollars to open up the women's economic element school, why isn't that a id dod? thedds significantly to security of the country. basically the answer is because the dod did a number of things. of theed the development country, which is so essential to its security. , thee story we got american university the town student talks about his life experience. the taliban was there and took refuge with his family. younger boy at that time. as third -- soon as the taliban were dripping out he came back. as a matter fact, how to read and to write. now interviewing as a job as a .ales manager there are full fulbright scholars at the university in kabul. he wanted me to say thank you to the american people. this is as close as i could come. the education system and afghanistan. so many of them, the number given to them is counterintuitive. so i do not use it. in terms of the lower grades, before you get to colleges and unive
: absolutely but dianne feinstein is not the person to do it. her biggest negotiation comes in from the defense contractors. a need to replace her with someone else like henry waxman or bernie sanders. jonathan strong who covers congress for national review magazine tweeted this about feinstein cause reaction -- -- feinstein's reaction -- thomason maryland, and republican caller. alexander had it right on the money. we are going through a lot of politics. obviously it is unpopular. associate nominee good things with the word "espionage." many goodciate not things with the word "s cannot show." -- "espionage." going back to it alexander said, made ace s valtem and we usually have to justify things with probable cause. we are not willy-nilly spying on angela merkel. that is a good strategy to half. there is some intelligence -- if there is some intelligence we are doing legitimately, we can always fall back on it and that is pretty much what i want to say. the story in "the washington post" has the headline -- group thatbipartisan wants to rein in the nsa spying program and stop this dragnet coll
financial, energy, information sectors to defense discuss the implementation of the president's executive order improving infrastructure cybersecurity. this meeting is part of the administration's ongoing dialogue with the private sector on cybersecurity. second announcement. this went on a different subject. the centers for medicare and studies announce major savings for seniors and people due tosabilities measures by the affordable care act to strengthen medicare. next year, premiums and adaptable spore medicare part b, which covers items like physicians visits, outpatient hospital services, and durable medical equipment, will not increase. zero percent growth from 2013. in fact the average growth for part b premiums over the last five years was slower than nearly any other five-year period in the program's history and health care spending has grown more slowly in the last two years than in the last 50 years. today we learned that since the affordable care act became law, more than 7.1 million seniors and people with disabilities one $8.3 billion prescription drugs in the ofghnut hole,
, the mystic and foreign. we work closely with the state usaid, defense department, with the government of iraq, and many others in order to prevent, and resolve violent conflict. i would like to recognize some of the folks here today. of course, prime minister maladie, thank you for returning to the institute. have the minister of foreign defense the minister of advisor,ional security and both members of the council of representatives. the ambassador to the united chief staff to the prime minister, the chief media adviser in the office of the prime minister, head of counterterrorism bureau, deputy chief of mission for the embassy and the military general who is the attachÉ for the embassy of iraq. today, formers secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state for the united states, madeleine albright great i am listing her team,t of the usip which includes steve hadley, jeremy rads, kristin lord, our executive vice president. i would like to recognize a couple of special state ambassadorguest, jones, the assistant secretary of state for near east affairs, the u.s. ambassador to iraq
to address here is corporate tax reform. question, as it relates to defense spending, there is no question in my mind that additional reductions in defense spending are going to have to happen. they will have to be done in a way that focuses on a strategic goal of protecting this country going forward. we're back to the same situation of balancing out spending reductions, whether in defense versus food stamps. we have to find a balance between all of our spending and stay on a path that is fiscally sound for the future of our children and grandchildren. the caller brings up for a sanders and an editorial of his from last week. do not cut the big benefit programs. we must not balance the budget on the backs of the most full marble people in our country. what do you think ernie sanders -- bernie sanders'role will be? case for will make the the whole marvel members of our society. i think that is a useful role but he plays. thatasic problem here is it is the entitlement programs and not the safety net programs. it is the medicare and social security programs going forward we will have to addr
for the grand jury. and there were defense attorneys that decided to attack the stem by claiming judges were by a disproportionate number, appointing too many anglos as grand jury foremen because that's what judges did. judges selected the informationman for the grand jury. did not select the members. but among the members, would choose who the foreman would be. and i was subpoenaed one time back then without the defense attorneys doing their homework and they intended to put me on the stand in their attack on a raceist grand jury foreman system and used that to establish that, gee, it was grossly unfair, disproportionately number of anglos were chosen. and before i testified, they did their homework and found out hat actually, it was a disproportionate appointment, if you only looked at race, i had ppointed proportionly more african-americans as informationmen of my grand jury than the percentage of african-americans in my district. . and the reason i did that is because i didn't care who anybody's race was. it didn't matter to me. but i had to look at the backgrounds of the individuals, lo
closely with the state department, usaid, the defense department, with the government of iraq, and many others. all in order to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflicts. i would like to go ahead and recognize some of the folks who are here today. of course, prime minister maliki, thank you for returning to the institute. excellency bashar zebari, minister of foreign affairs. the minister of defense. mr. off i had, national security advisor. arkin's a beery, both members of the council of representatives. so, the ambassador to the united states. also the chief media adviser in the office of the prime minister. the head of the counterterrorism the deputy chief of mission for the embassy of iraq, and the major general who is the military attachÉ for the embassy at iraq. -- todaying us to say is one of my favorite people in all of the world, former secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state to united states, madeleine albright. i am listing her as part of the u.s. ip team, which includes steve hadley, former national security adviser and a member of professor jeremy
and troops and president karzai. we also met with the foreign minister there, the defense minister before we went to afghanistan. basically, we feel that things have significantly improved and changed for the better during the last 10 year period. i have been there perhaps 12 times or so. me laterwill tell today it was only 11 are really 13. [laughter] i have been there a lot. strikinges are pretty particularly in the last few years. that's not the impression the american public have. i will get into that in a moment. that, to me, is the obvious fact, that things have changed and changed for the better in a number of ways in afghanistan. first of all, it's more secure. it's more secure because we came. it's that simple. we and our allies made a difference. army,owth of the afghan the strength of the afghan army and the police now have grown into much more capable and respected force including the local police which is made a major difference particularly in the villages of afghanistan because they are directly connected to the elders in those villages. perhaps the most feared force our the
this year we saw the rigid requirements that harmed the department of defense when president obama's sequester took place. before these cuts, the nonpartisan congressional budget office said our defense program was already underfunded by 5% with modernization underfunded by 10%. thankfully, congress took quick action that allowed the d.o.d. to operate under a budget in order to meet all of their nisscal requirements and have more flexibility as they asosh the across-the-board sequester cuts. general odierno revealed just this week that two army brigades are combat ready and training has come to a halt. this is a terrifying reality given that only two months ago president obama addressed congress and the public asking for support for a military attack on syria. we absolutely cannot send our troops who are not trained, not equipped and not prepared into harm's way. our military readiness should never ever be threatened like this. as the world's superpower, our armed forces must be ready to deploy thousands of troops, should the need arrives. it is downsizing in afghanistan and prepar
of months ago that was on the defense appropriations bill. i teamed up with john conyers, and this is not a partisan issue . this is for republicans, democrats, libertarians, conservatives, liberals, everyone in between. when we fought for that amendment and we took to the house floor and had that debate, that was the proudest moment for me as an elected official. [cheers] >> we brought republicans and democrats together to speak on that amendment. we only had 7.5 minutes. that is the debate time they gave us, seven and a half minutes to talk about one of the most important issues facing our country and the world. we split it up between 11 or 12 people. on both sides of the aisle. i have to tell you that afterwards, after we had that debate, people were saying congratulations, they were proud of what we had done even though we had not had the vote yet. when the vote came down, it was close, it scared people. it scared the establishment in both parties. we have the president of the united states fighting against the amendment. it was the first time in his administration th
can expect if washington democrats continue their stubborn defense of this partisan law. now, mr. president, on another .atter politicians regularly come to washington promising fiscal responsibility. since congress passed the bca with overwhelming bipartisan , washington has actually reduced the level of government spending for two years running. the bca savings are such a big deal that the president inpaigned on it endlessly 2012. he bragged about the bipartisan .uts he told audiences from california to baltimore that he signed $2 trillion in spending cuts into law. like to say these days, elections matter and the president explicitly stated that he put these on the back of the bipartisan spending cuts. fromet the exit polls november. two thirds said raising taxes to cut the deficit was a nonstarter. whiched to obamacare, more voters said they wanted to repeal, the levels of support are striking. if our friends on the other side contradict -- keep obamacare contradicted by the then have to called the mandate for reducing the size of government day superman date -- a super manda
background checks are adequate. areomes as officials analyzing how defense contractor aaron alexis was able to have a secret clearance despite a series of violent outbursts, repeated russia's with the law, and concerns about his mental health. live coverage of the hearing at 10:00 a.m. eastern time. spancan see that here on c- or listen on c-span radio. these are the latest headlines on c-span radio. was officiallyg my grandmother's white house were trip. lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of the first ladies to hang in the white house. she thought that was important. she looked high and low and she official find her portrait. she called and said, mrs. truman, do you know where that painting is? we can't find it. yeah, it is on my wall. said you really shouldn't have that. my grandmother said, no, it is my painting. it is on my wall. i think mrs. johnson tried a few more times. we will continue our series live on monday as we look at first lady mimi eisenhower. continues. journal" host: in our last segment this morning, we are joined by editorr jones" story lauren williams from th
, and theminister of defense, andonal security advisor, both members of the council of representatives. the ambassador to the united , the chief of staff to the chiefminister, who is the media adviser in the office of the prime minister. the head of the counterterrorism chief of deputy mission to the embassy of iraqi and the major general, the military at tash a for the embassy of the rack. myo joining us today, one of favorite people in all of the world, former secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state, madeleine albright. i'm listing her as part of the includes ourwhich national security advisor and member of our board, ambassador george is who is with us. also a member of our board. .rofessor jeremy ratigan dr. kristin lord is with us, our executive vice president. i would like to recognize a couple of special state department guest. ambassador beth jones, the assistant secretary of state for near east affairs and the u.s. ambassador to iraq. and the deputy assistant secretary of state to a rack and around. and now, i would like to recognize bill taylor, ambassador b
other countries. an army for our defense. our security forces are aiming at defending iraq and its sovereignty and not targeting any countries. >> as someone who used to be a politician, i should know better than to ask such a question. [laughter] is there a common vision for governing iraq shared by the political block and if the answer is no, what could be done about that? >> the answer is, yes. definitely yes. to the exception of those who do not want to work in the interest of iraq and those who have specific agendas. all of the iraqis say yes. we have a common ground, a common vision based on the constitution, the institutions that we built. if you want to ask me why you have problems, i would say democracy needs lots of time and solutions. e have a heavy legacy. moving from central government based on one single nationality into democracy is not something easy. national identity -- all of this eeds time. none of the iraqis wants the return of a single party or needs a country without a constitution. the problem is about solutions to the many problems that we face in moving fr
of defense. it has been debated ever since. i do not think we have sorted it out. we have not come up with a clear answer to that question. what happens now is case-by-case, we evaluate whether these things violate some sort of sovereign principle. this is really messy, and it ill not get better soon. there is a moral discussion and there is a practical discussion, keeping america safe. these things mixed together in a way that is not quite as clear as the constitutional and personal debate in the united states. >> i would need some help in you framing the question to understand how you would want me to address it on the omestic front. >> any of the cartels that operate along the lines of communication in and out of texas. a 45-minute running gun battle in downtown nuevo laredo included hand grenades and automatic weapons. that type of information. we are connecting the dots. data and information are intelligence. we are putting intelligence and security in the lead in terms of what is now the right to protect. the debate here is security over privacy. in my mind, we have bridged hat
to the department of defense? and did they report it? >> senator, in this particular case that you just described, in terms of a national security perspective, it behaves everyone to report any unusual activity they see, whether it be a colleague, a co-worker or a subordinate that works for you. >> and the second half of my question was, did they report it? >> to the best of my knowledge, sir, it was reported to the mother, as you described there. i am not positive whether or not they reported it to d.o.d. >> i ask both you and mr. lewis to answer that question for the record. i'll give mr. lewis a chance to answer it right now. >> the contractor is required to report any derogatory information coming to their attention regarding a cleared employee. the defense security service has done a followup review at the experts and they've determined that the company was aware of the indications of mental instability on mr. alexis' part and they failed to report that information. >> all right, thank you. mr. lewis, stay with this area of questioning, what do you think should be the role of d.o.d. contract
years. this question was most clearly brought out with the preemptive doctrine of defense. it has been debated ever since. i do not think we have sorted it out. we have not come up with a clear answer to that question. what happens now is case-by- case, we evaluate whether these things violate some sort of sovereign principle. there is a moral discussion and there is a practical discussion, keeping america safe. these things mixed together in a way that is not quite as clear as the constitutional and personal debate in the united states. >> i would need some help in you framing the question to understand how you would want me to address it on the domestic front. >> any of the cartels that operate along the lines of communication in texas. a 45 minute running gun battle in downtown nuevo laredo included hand grenades and automatic weapons. that type of information. we are connecting the dots. data and information are intelligence. we are putting intelligence and security in the lead in terms of what is now the right to protect. the debate here is security over in my mind, we have bridge
. the white house, the state department -- crisscross. the white house, the state department, the defense department, the c.i.o. were all involved, resulting in overlapping but uncoordinated investigations. benghazi was a terrorist attack. we needed team effort to find out what happened. why it happened. and how we are going to bring the perpetrators to justice. any of these chairmen would be capable of leading this select committee, and other members of their committees would be very good to serve as well. they would do a good job. i have confidence in them. let me be clear, i have no intention of chairing or serving on the select committee. i will not serve on the select committee. i just want to learn the truth, just like the american people. there is a history in congress that when things overlap between committees and transcend jurisdictions, select committees were established. two well-known examples, watergate and iran contra. i am submitting for the record a list of the past select committees over the past 50 years, which will be at the end of my statement. a select committee woul
our country safe by producing the best defense industry and the average americans can outproduce their counterparts overseas. we are going to take the genius of our inventors and we are going to squash it by giving in to corporate interests, of multinational corporations that not owing their allegiance to us but their company which they see now as an international company, not even an american company. i ask my colleagues to join me in rejecting this attempt to diminish the fundamental property rights, intellectual property rights of the american people in the name of some troll or scary title that would get us away from the basic fundamentals of what is being proposed. i ask my colleagues to join me n opposing this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman yield back? mr. rohrabacher: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. mr. rohrabacher: would you like a motion from the floor to adjourn? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. rohrabacher: i do now move that this body do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the que
. will you i don't happen to think your reputation as a public ant needs a lot of defense. it is beyond reproach and exceptional and i thank you for it. i thank you as well for the the agencyin which moved to implement the reverse mortgage act. i think it helped a lot and finds about the fha. here, to coinmes a verb, complex of five -- comp lexify things. eight,stand that on page transfer says that the was triggered are required almost entirely as a result of the performance in the program? >> that is correct. true that the accounting transfer of $1.7 billion was calculated based on ofa prior to the enactment the reverse mortgage reform stabilization act and its implementation? is a little more difficult because i would just the 1.7 -- there is an element of the receipts that are low but alas, as it was soon to an earlier question. >> the implementation of the reverse mortgage stabilization reform act, i am getting the title all screwed up. but think you know what i'm referring to. >> just to be fair, the next time you will see numbers like this is when the president does the re-estima
around the world, the question is what are we going to lose next? we seem to be on the defensive and they are on the offense it. the question is, what are we going to do -- lose this year more than what are we going to gain? you can look around the whole circle of the world and you find one spot after another where the question is, is it going to be iran or egypt or korea? what is a going to be? >> you talked about elite schools. where did he go early in his life to school? >> his mother didn't think public schools were good enough for him so they engaged a number of private tutors and he went on to princeton. he was quite an outstanding student there. his brother also went to developed at they totally united view of the world. they always saw the world in the same way, politically and ideologically. but in their personalities, they were totally different. foster dulles was very dour, very unfriendly, very offputting. i read in one book, even his friends and like him. allen dulles was exactly the opposite. he was a sparkling conversationalist. >> let misha you some video of allen
. they are the first-line line of defense against to these maniacs . i think it is ridiculous. --t: you mean tsa agency e tsa agents? caller: i'm not talking about 10 yards or 20 yards away. i'm talking about have somebody somewhere in the immediate facility with a weapon. airport was roaming the and nobody with a gun was anywhere to be found. as far as other procedures that could take place either from the airport loss -- airport's point of view or government's point of view, your thoughts on arming tsa agents, what are your thoughts on how to improve overall airport security? i guess you have to get them in the front door. this guy apparently walked in the front or with a weapon. if you go to a lot of places, schools or whatever, you walk through a metal to tactic. that is what we need, get them from the front as they come in the door. host: the orange county register has a graphic. with a man opened fire semi automatic weapon. this is the tsa screening area. he continued to shoot, according to a witness. tsa officer gerardo hernandez .as shot from the point where he enters into the point where he ge
with the support of many groups, including the national farmers union, national corn growers, it national defense fund, it was quite a group and we look forward to working with the house on that. now the senator will address the work we have done with conservation challenges like flooding. we also have limited direct payments to form the commodity programs by strengthening some of the payment limits to make sure the people eligible or farmers and not urban millionaires. we have continued the successful sugar program. the livestock program, and i also strongly support the funding in our bill for the senate energy provision, including expanding homegrown renewable energy as we look at the success of reduced dependence on foreign oil, from 60% to 40%. a lot of it has to deal with what i have seen from biofuels, 10% of our nation's fuel supply, they have been very important to this change. the new farmers and ranchers provision is something we have worked hard on including in the bill. the importance of the snap and seniorsilies still need to put food on the table. the senate made some that's me -- m
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